Seeking community members for meeting on artificial intelligence and health equity

Researchers at Western University and the University of Toronto are hosting a meeting that seeks to explore and discuss how artificial intelligence (AI) could either reduce or worsen health inequities in Canada. In addition to inviting AI scientists and health researchers to this meeting, we are also inviting those who may often not have a chance to voice their perspectives on issues like this, such as individuals from communities that are commonly underrepresented in relation to emerging health technologies. If you feel this applies to you or individuals you work with through your organization, please forward this to others and consider attending.

The event will run from 1-5pm on Thursday, November 7th and 8:30am-5pm on Friday, November 8th. Events on the 7th will take place at the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and events on the 8th will take place at the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence, both located in Toronto. In recognition of the travel and time investment required by this initiative, we would be happy to cover travel, meals, and accommodation expenses. The option to receive a modest honorarium proportionate to time invested also exists, based on individual circumstances.

If you are interested in attending and participating, or if you have any questions, please email Maxwell Smith (maxwell.smith@uwo.ca).

Mental health care delivery in Canada and Ghana: enhancing community integration of people diagnosed and treated for mental illness

On April 30, 2019, graduate student Joseph Adu delivered a poster presentation at Lawson Health Research Day regarding his proposed comparative analysis of community integration post-mental health hospitalization in Canada and Ghana. Both high-income and low-income nations face challenges in responding to the rising burden of mental illness. To mitigate the negative impacts of mental illnesses, it is imperative that those who seek acute care services are able to comfortably return to the community and to employment post-discharge.

View the full poster PDF

It is hoped that this proposed study will identify the key issues affecting the integration of mental health patients into communities and influence policy and practice where mental health services delivery are concerned.

Adu, J. & Oudshoorn, A. (Apr 30, 2019). Mental health care delivery in Canada and Ghana: Identifying resources and support networks to enhance community integration of people diagnosed and treated for mental illness.
Lawson Health Research Day, London, ON.

So, what is a Community Research Incubator?

The Community Research Incubator is next week. But what is this thing, exactly? Great question!

Think of it as a recipe.

First, start with a room full of passionate and creative people: community leaders, researchers, program designers and evaluators, students, and others.

For the second ingredient, add some specific questions, problems, or projects into the mix for discussion. These might include program ideas, nascent research initiatives, materializing concepts in need of collaborators, and so on.

The next ingredient is a very thin layer of technology: a set of screens around the room that provide minute-by-minute updates of each conversation. This monitoring allows everyone in the room to self-organize and connect themselves to conservations where they feel they have the most to learn or contribute.

Lastly, stir everything together in a relaxed environment and provide some light refreshments to help keep up the glucose levels! (A nice topping is to add the option for those who are interested in purchasing a pint as well.)

Even if you cannot attend the Community Research Incubator this coming Tuesday, you can still contribute as a CRHESI member. Review this list of initial table discussions and forward this message on to anyone who you know who might be able to resource, support, or benefit from these topics:

Topic: Nurturing research and collaboration on dis/ability and inclusive physical activity in London and region
Point person: David Howe, Associate Professor, Dr Frank Hayden Endowed Chair in Sport and Social Impact, School of Kinesology, School of Kinesiology, Western University, david.howe@uwo.ca

Topic: ATN intends to establish an adaptive kitchen at the Old East Village Grocer as the home training site of the Nourishing Abilities Cooking Club and is developing a broad-based community collaborative with a variety of expertise and specializations to help inform program design, evaluation and delivery.
Point person: Vito Mendonca, Manager of Community Partnerships, ATN Access for Persons with Disabilities Inc., v.mendonca@atn.ca

Topic: How do organizations define and conceptualize ‘health equity’ and how do they feel it ought to be pursued, given where they are situated in the community?
Point person: Maxwell Smith, Assistant Professor, School of Health Studies, Western University, maxwell.smith@uwo.ca

Topic: Opportunities for working with Western students to advance community initiatives and programming through Community Engaged Learning.
Point person: Kelly Hollingshead, Community Engaged Learning Coordinator, Western University, khollin2@uwo.ca

Topic: What guides are other organizations in London using as benchmarks for equity and diversity best practices?
Point person: Tamara Kaattari, Executive Director, Literacy Link South Central, literacylink@llsc.on.ca

Topic: Let’s talk about how the structures and context of academic research have defined research collaborations
Point person: Anita Kothari, Associate Professor, School of Health Studies, akothari@uwo.ca

All CRHESI and community members are invited to join us on Tuesday, September 24, 3 PM – 4:30 PM at the Fox and Fiddle (355 Wellington). Please register via Eventbrite.

If you have an idea, project, or problem in mind that you would like to bring to a future Community Research Incubator for broader collaboration and input, please let us know at info@crhesi.ca

CRHESI Reorganizes Around Four Annual Member and Community Events

Bringing communities together to collaboratively identify, research, understand, and address ‘wicked problems’ that prevent access to justice, health, and belonging for all people. (CRHESI Objective)

Since the launch of CRHESI in November 2015, we have learned a great deal about building effective university-community collaborations. Now it is time to build upon what we have learned. Over the last twelve months, we have synthesized and incorporated the experience of the past four years into our working priorities and directions for the next phase of our journey.

As a result, beginning this September, the ‘CRHESI calendar’ year will be organized around four key events per year: two ‘lightning talks’ sessions and two community research incubator sessions. Together, these four events serve as our foundational programming strategy for instigating and reporting back on membership and community partnerships.

The lightning talk events are, in essence, biannual mini-conferences. Each event provides wide-ranging updates about research and collaboration endeavours in the region that relate to health equity and social inclusion. Lightning talk events also feature a community reception as well for informal connecting.

The community research incubators establish a bi-annual, adaptive and engaging forum for connecting community leaders, academics, local organizations, and students around new issues, community needs, and research opportunities.

▪The next community research incubator is September 24, 3:00 – 4:30 PM (RSVP)

▪The next lightning talks event is Thursday, November 21, 3:00 – 4:30 PM (RSVP)

▪The schedule for all upcoming lightning talks and community research incubators through 2022 are posted on the CRHESI events page.

All CRHESI members are strongly encouraged to prioritize participation in these events. We are refocusing/reallocating significant coordination resources to maximize the effectiveness and value of these sessions as core engagement priorities. In short: these four yearly event events are the four most important CRHESI events in the year.

If you are interested in becoming more involved, presenting, or utilizing these sessions in order to galvanize new projects or forge new collaborations, please email us at info@crhesi.ca. If you are interested in becoming a CRHESI member, click here to learn more about joining our ecosystem of community and university partners.

Research Associate Position

CRHESI member Dr. Javeed Sukhera is looking for a Research Associate. This is a part-time position averaging 20 hours per week for a 2-year term. We are specifically looking for someone with expertise in qualitative approaches (constructivist grounded theory, ethnography, critical theory, etc.,).

The primary activities for this position are to support a research study that explores the process of care for people who inject drugs (PWID) in acute care settings. This includes coordinating a research study using constructivist grounded theory, coordinating a community advisory council, and supporting knowledge translation/dissemination. Specific activities would include but may not be limited to: recruitment of research participants, maintaining research files including informed consent documentation, collecting research data from observations, interviews, and focus groups, and providing support for data analysis, literature searches and manuscript writing.

The Research Associate will be a critical facilitator of the research program of the Department of Psychiatry and Dr. Sukhera’s Program of research. There is also a direct relationship with the Centre for Education Research and Innovation (CERI) at Western. This research program addresses key areas of teaching and learning in clinical settings, with a specific focus on implicit bias, stigma, and equity.

To apply, please use the UWO careers website and look for posting #16704. For more information, please contact Dr. Sukhera directly at Javeed.Sukhera@lhsc.on.ca.